Category 2018 Festival

S.A.M.S Press Release, Re, Flag Retirement Ceremony

Contact: William Wolf
Scottish American Military Society
Phone 315-353-2706
Email: wdwolf@ix.netcom.com

Press Release

Bring your old and torn National flags to the SAMS U.S. Flag Retirement Ceremony at the 2018 Finger Lakes Celtic Games & Festival.

Flag retirement ceremony to honor worn, tattered flags

While burial of an American flag could be considered honorable, it is not the proper means of showing respect to our national emblem. The proper method of destroying a flag is by burning it in a dignified ceremony.

At 6:35 pm, immediately following the closing ceremonies at the Finger Lakes Celtic Games & Festival on Saturday, May 19, a fitting tribute to the retirement of unserviceable US Flags will be held on the main field. With the pomp and circumstance befitting the symbol of our nation, SAMS (Scottish American Military Society) Post 75 will perform this important community service. You may bring your own ragged and torn National flags to the SAMS tent in Clan Village anytime during the day to have them retired with the dignity they have earned.

A set of rules for civilian flag courtesy know as The Flag Code was first formulated by the National Flag Conference meeting in Washington, DC, June 14-15, 1923. The United States Flag Code 36s 176(k) states: “The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem of display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning.”

Everyone is invited and encouraged to take part in this moving ceremony that will honor our Flag, our Country, and most importantly our Veterans. Those who attend will come away with a great sense of pride and learn something they may not have known about our country and our flag. Respect, Honor, and Tradition will all be showcased at this great community event.

Mark your calendars now for the 3rd weekend in May. This Finger Lakes Celtic Games & Festival is held at 4925 Collett Road, Shortsville, NY 14548. This year’s Festival will be great with Pipe Bands, the Heavy Athletic competitions, Celtic musicians, Irish and Scottish dance, Clan exhibits, Arts and Crafts Exhibits, great food vendors, and many great merchandise vendors.

Membership in the Scottish American Military Society is open to honorable discharged veterans or active duty or reserve military persons who have served or are serving with any branch of the US Armed Forces and are of Scottish decent. For more information, contact William Wolf at (315) 353-2706, via email at: wdwolf@ix.netcom.com.

Bring your old and torn National flags to the SAMS U.S. Flag Retirement Ceremony at the 2018 Finger Lakes Celtic Games & Festival.

SAMS Flag Retirement at the
Loch Norman Highland Games, NC

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Scottish Recipes

Colcannon

The Ingredients:
4 Medium Potatoes, peeled and boiled
3 Tablespoons Butter
1/2 teaspoon Sea Salt
1/8 teaspoon Black Pepper
1/4 cup Milk
2 Tablespoons Sour Cream
8 ounces Kale or one small head of cabbage, steamed and chopped
1 Tablespoon Onion, grated

The Directions:
Cook potatoes.
Steam kale or cabbage and chop.
Mash potatoes with butter, salt, pepper, milk and sour cream until light and fluffy.
Stir in chopped kale or cabbage and grated onion.
Serve at once.

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Shortbread

Scotland is famous for its shortbread, which goes back to the Roman occupation . It was a traditional marriage cake that was broken over the head of the bride to assure fertility. The use of rice flour or corn starch guarantees a light and fragile consistency-and keeps the bride from harm. It was probably originally made with honey as a sweetener. When shaped into Petticoat Tails, these traditional Scottish biscuits date back beyond the 12th century. The triangles fit together into a circle and were the same shape as the pieces of fabric used to make a full-gored petticoat in Elizabethan times. The biscuits got their name because in those days the word for a pattern was a ‘tally’, and so the biscuits became known as ‘petticote tallis’.

Ingredients
½ cup unsalted butter, softened
¼ cup granulated sugar, plus extra for dredging
¾ cup all- purpose flour
¼ cup rice flour or corn starch

In a medium bowl, cream the butter and sugar together until pale and fluffy. Sift the two flours together twice to incorporate air to lighten the biscuit. Gradually stir the sifted flour into the butter mixture. Draw the mixture together and press into an 7 inch round tin. Prick well all over and pinch up the edges with a finger and thumb. Mark into 8 triangles with a sharp knife. Bake at 325°F for about 40 minutes, until pale straw in color. Leave in the tin for 5 minutes, cut into 8 triangles, then dredge with sugar. Remove from the tin when cold. Store in an airtight container. Lasts for a long time if not eaten immediately.

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The Food ways of Scotland have been influenced in many ways over the centuries by a variety of outside forces. The Romans, after hopelessly skirmishing with local clans for decades, gave up the fight, built Hadrian’s wall, and settled down to enjoy life in Lowland Scotland and add to the local cuisine. The Romans brought herds of beef cattle and a love for lentils with them! The Vikings added rutabagas to the Scottish dinner table and the potatoes came from the New World. When the Scots reached the backcountry of America, they began to drink hard cider and make wild game, especially venison, into an important part of their diet.

Roman Beef, Barley, And Lentil Stew

The Ingredients:
8 oz. stew beef, cut in cubes
1 tbsp. butter
2 oz. pearl barley
3 oz. red lentils
2 leeks

The Directions:
Sea salt to taste
Place the barley and lentils in a pot and cover with water. Leave to soak preferably overnight.
In a large covered cast iron pot, melt the butter and then brown the beef in it. Chop up the leeks (including green stems) and sauté with the beef, add salt. Add soaked barley and lentils. Add water to cover. Simmer the stew gently, with the lid on, for about one hour. Serves 8.

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Haggis
The Haggis is a very old, traditional Scottish dish that combines meats, spices and oatmeal. A traditional recipe for The Haggis would involve the boiled and minced liver, lungs and heart of a sheep mixed with chopped onions, toasted oatmeal, salt, pepper, and spices. The mixture would then be stuffed into the cleaned sheep’s stomach, sewn up, leaving enough room for expansion to avoid an explosion, and then boiled.

WAIT! DON’T GO!

We have an updated version of The Haggis for you prepared with modern techniques that just may tickle your culinary fancy. And rather than using a sheep’s stomach you can prepare The Haggis in a bowl or use the same type of casing most commonly used to make breakfast sausage. Ask your butcher if they will sell you sausage casing. Go ahead, be adventurous-you just might like it!

INGREDIENTS
1/2 lb minced lamb shoulder
1/2 lb minced beef
6 oz beef suet
1/2 lb beef liver
1 cup oatmeal
1 cup stock (reserve this from the boiled meat)
2 finely chopped onions
1/2 tsp grated nutmeg
1/4 tsp ground mace
1/4 tsp of cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp ground coriander
Sea salt and black pepper to taste.

METHOD
Preheat oven to 250-300 F
Place the liver in cold water, bring to a boil and allow the liver to boil for 5 minutes. Let cool
Chop the liver with the onion as finely as you can
Boil the remaining meat in a large stock pot for approximately one hour. Let cool
Reserve the stock
Meanwhile, toast the oatmeal in a saute pan shaking constantly to be sure all toasts equally and doesn’t burn.
Chop all the meats finely.
Mix all the ingredients including the reserved stock
Transfer to a well greased oven-proof glass bowl and cover with a layer of foil or parchment paper.
Place in a baie marie (a water bath) using a pan large enough to accommodate the bowl and add warm water to come 3/4 of the way up the bowl. Check from time to time to replenish the water level.
Cook for 3 hours.
To serve, cut open the casing, if you are using one, and spoon out the filling.
Serve with neeps and tatties. (Turnips and potatoes mashed together with butter)

Courtesy of Deborah Keegan
The Scoop

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The Clans of Scotland

About The Clans of Scotland

The intriguing Scottish clan system plays a big role in Scottish culture and tradition and has its roots in the ancient Celtic tribal system. So it fits in perfectly!
A clan has been many things, over hundreds of years…..
…. including a family group, a political system, and a means of defending territory and ensuring survival in harsh conditions and difficult times.
It’s as hardy and resilient as the Scottish people themselves and has survived (and thrived) throughout centuries littered with bloody battles, as well as many attempts to destroy them.
Today, Scots around the world are still committed to their clan heritage and fiercely proud of it too.
In fact with today’s growing interest in genealogy, heritage and history, you could say that clans are seeing a ‘revival’ of their own.

How The Clans Were Born….
The Scottish clan system seems to have been well established by the 11th and 12th century, but signs of their existence go back as far as the 6th century.
The word ‘clan’ comes from the Gaelic word ‘clann’, which meant ‘family, offspring, children’ and that’s basically what they still represent, large family groups.
The original clans of Scotland were basically extended family groups, the majority of members were related by blood and descended from a common ancestor.
They also contained a number of ‘Septs’, which were families who didn’t have direct blood ties to the Clan Chief (or Chieftain) but were still associated with it.
Often these Septs wielded a certain amount of clan power themselves.
Other individuals sometimes joined a clan to show their support or to seek protection or simply to stay alive.
In the beginning clan names were usually tied to specific areas, known as ‘clan territories’, they were created to bond residents of that area and to protect it from being invaded or stolen by other groups.
Interesting Fact!
North of mainland Scotland lies the The Shetland Isles and the Orkney Isles.
These were part of Norway until the mid-15th century when they were ‘gifted’ to Scotland.
They never adopted the clan system, or many of the other traditional Scottish cultural traditions such as kilts or bagpipes.
Plus, that type of landscape also helped when it came to setting up defenses to protect individual territories.
Each individual Scottish clan was tightly bound together, by blood and by loyalties, and they tended to develop their own very specific customs, traditions and laws.
Loyalty and devotion ran deep, and feuds with rival clans were often passed down through the generations – the ill-will refusing to diminish over time.
Many bloody battles were fought over clan territories, and there was generally no love lost between the Highland clans of Scotland and the Lowland clans or septs.
By the 1800’s they were under attack in the form of increasing pressure from the English monarchy and British Government.
In 1746 a Scottish rebellion was defeated at the Battle of Culloden, and the Scottish clan system was almost destroyed.
However, the Scots are nothing if not determined and hardy, and they clung to their traditions and beliefs and in the 19th Century they saw the popularity of their clans begin to see a revival.
Since then a growing interest in Scottish history & culture has people across the world wanting to learn more about their Celtic ancestry and roots.
Overall, the clans have played a huge role in shaping the culture, traditions, attitudes and sentiments of the Scottish people.

How The Clan System Works
When we think of a family we tend to think of blood-relatives, but of course there are relatives by marriage (‘in-laws’), and close friends who we consider to be family.
Clans worked in a similar way, with each one being led by a Clan Chief (or Chieftain) whose family would usually lived in their own ancestral castle.
Each clan had their own fiercely-guarded territory or land and was ruled by the powerful Chieftain who controlled just about every aspect of daily life.
But historically, these are much more than family groups, in fact for centuries this was the main political system in Scotland.
Membership passes down through the male side of the family (patriarchal).
It’s centered around the man’s last name, so once a woman marries she becomes part of her husband’s clan – while the rest of her birth family remain members of her father’s clan.
Also, it wasn’t unusual for the Clan Chief’s children to be raised by a maternal uncle and his family in a different clan.
Both of these practices helped build ties between clans which paid off during times of trouble or attack. There’s strength in numbers, and friendly clans would join together to protect land, cattle and other resources.
Today, the distinctive Scottish tartan (if you’re American, think ‘plaid’) is closely tied to the clan system, but this wasn’t always the case.
Tartan comes in an almost endless variety of colors and patterns (although all feature the interlocking horizontal and vertical lines).
____________
*From All About The Clans of Scotland, http://www.scottish-at-heart.com/clans-of-scotland.html

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History of The Scottish Games

History of The Scottish Games

Modern Scottish Festivals have their roots in the middle ages. We have reports of athletic competition (“Games”) at many times and places when people gathered together; fairs, military musters (“wapenschaws”), even funerals! Games which now feature track and field events, music, and dance have been held in the village of Ceres (in Fife) since shortly after the battle of Bannockburn in 1314.

Scottish Games as we know them today began to develop in 1781 when the Highland Society of Falkirk sponsored prize money and trophies for competitions in dancing, piping, and athletics during the town’s Fall Fair. In 1818 a Games was presented in St. Fillan’s with piping, athletics, and dancing (including the Sword Dance for the first time). Within a few years Gatherings were being held at many towns throughout Scotland. Many of these Gatherings are still being held today.

The increasing popularity of these events eventually led to attempts to standardize the rules of competition and judging. Sanctioning bodies were formed to develop uniform rules and maintain records, Highland dancing, piping, and drumming teachers and judges stand for regular examinations to maintain their certification. With renewed interest in Scottish harp and fiddle their sanctioning organizations are seeing new growth.

As Scots immigrated to far-flung lands they took their sport and culture with them. Tradition tells us that Games were held near Ellerbe, North Carolina in the late 1700s; most sources state that the first Games in the U.S. were presented by Scottish emigrants living in Boston in 1853. One source does state that the Boston Scots had been meeting for “traditional games” for several years before that. There is also a description of the “First Sportive Meet” of the Highland Society of New York in the Emigrant and Old Countryman of October 19, 1836 which gives some indication that regular competition took place during the first half of the 19th Century.

By 1861 at least three other Caledonian Clubs had joined Boston – New York, Philadelphia, and Newark, New Jersey. The Civil War delayed the spread of these events, but by 1875 Highland Games were being held in at least 125 communities across America. These “Caledonian Games” generally included competitions in dancing, music, and athletics; the athletics could include foot races, hurdle races, wrestling, pole-vaulting, high and long jump, hop, skip and jump, putting the heavy stone, throwing the hammer and the light and heavy weights and turning the caber.

With the rise in intercollegiate athletics in the late 1800’s participation at Scottish Games went into a decline. Many events folded; the ones that survived refocused on their cultural heritage and expanded to become Festivals. Games and Festivals offer competition focused on traditional Scottish athletic events, dance and music; they have expanded to include “fun” competitions, non-competitive tests of skill and strength, and historical re-enactments.

The Scottish Games in the United States have grown because many people of Scottish descent still feel the pull of their ancestral homeland and heritage. The Games provide a connection to that heritage. For many, going to the Games is like going home to a family reunion.

Read More

The Clans of Scotland

About The Clans of Scotland

The intriguing Scottish clan system plays a big role in Scottish culture and tradition and has its roots in the ancient Celtic tribal system. So it fits in perfectly!

A clan has been many things, over hundreds of years…..
…. including a family group, a political system, and a means of defending territory and ensuring survival in harsh conditions and difficult times.

It’s as hardy and resilient as the Scottish people themselves and has survived (and thrived) throughout centuries littered with bloody battles, as well as many attempts to destroy them.

Today, Scots around the world are still committed to their clan heritage and fiercely proud of it too.

In fact with today’s growing interest in genealogy, heritage and history, you could say that clans are seeing a ‘revival’ of their own.

How The Clans Were Born….

The Scottish clan system seems to have been well established by the 11th and 12th century, but signs of their existence go back as far as the 6th century.

The word ‘clan’ comes from the Gaelic word ‘clann’, which meant ‘family, offspring, children’ and that’s basically what they still represent, large family groups.

The original clans of Scotland were basically extended family groups, the majority of members were related by blood and descended from a common ancestor.

They also contained a number of ‘Septs’, which were families who didn’t have direct blood ties to the Clan Chief (or Chieftain) but were still associated with it.

Often these Septs wielded a certain amount of clan power themselves.

Other individuals sometimes joined a clan to show their support or to seek protection or simply to stay alive.
In the beginning clan names were usually tied to specific areas, known as ‘clan territories’, they were created to bond residents of that area and to protect it from being invaded or stolen by other groups.

Interesting Fact!

North of mainland Scotland lies the The Shetland Isles and the Orkney Isles.

These were part of Norway until the mid-15th century when they were ‘gifted’ to Scotland.

They never adopted the clan system, or many of the other traditional Scottish cultural traditions such as kilts or bagpipes.

Plus, that type of landscape also helped when it came to setting up defenses to protect individual territories.

Each individual Scottish clan was tightly bound together, by blood and by loyalties, and they tended to develop their own very specific customs, traditions and laws.

Loyalty and devotion ran deep, and feuds with rival clans were often passed down through the generations – the ill-will refusing to diminish over time.

Many bloody battles were fought over clan territories, and there was generally no love lost between the Highland clans of Scotland and the Lowland clans or septs.

By the 1800’s they were under attack in the form of increasing pressure from the English monarchy and British Government.

In 1746 a Scottish rebellion was defeated at the Battle of Culloden, and the Scottish clan system was almost destroyed.

However, the Scots are nothing if not determined and hardy, and they clung to their traditions and beliefs and in the 19th Century they saw the popularity of their clans begin to see a revival.

Since then a growing interest in Scottish history & culture has people across the world wanting to learn more about their Celtic ancestry and roots.

Overall, the clans have played a huge role in shaping the culture, traditions, attitudes and sentiments of the Scottish people.

How The Clan System Works

When we think of a family we tend to think of blood-relatives, but of course there are relatives by marriage (‘in-laws’), and close friends who we consider to be family.

Clans worked in a similar way, with each one being led by a Clan Chief (or Chieftain) whose family would usually lived in their own ancestral castle.

Each clan had their own fiercely-guarded territory or land and was ruled by the powerful Chieftain who controlled just about every aspect of daily life.

But historically, these are much more than family groups, in fact for centuries this was the main political system in Scotland.

Membership passes down through the male side of the family (patriarchal).

It’s centered around the man’s last name, so once a woman marries she becomes part of her husband’s clan – while the rest of her birth family remain members of her father’s clan.

Also, it wasn’t unusual for the Clan Chief’s children to be raised by a maternal uncle and his family in a different clan.

Both of these practices helped build ties between clans which paid off during times of trouble or attack. There’s strength in numbers, and friendly clans would join together to protect land, cattle and other resources.

Today, the distinctive Scottish tartan (if you’re American, think ‘plaid’) is closely tied to the clan system, but this wasn’t always the case.

Tartan comes in an almost endless variety of colors and patterns (although all feature the interlocking horizontal and vertical lines).
____________
*From All About The Clans of Scotland, http://www.scottish-at-heart.com/clans-of-scotland.html

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A History of Scottish Kilts

A History of Scottish Kilts

Scottish kilts are known as “The National Dress of Scotland” and are a highly recognized form of dress throughout the world. Kilts have deep cultural and historical roots in the country of Scotland and are a sacred symbol of patriotism and honor for a true Scotsman. The word “kilt” is a derivation of the ancient Norse word, kjilt, which means pleated, and refers to clothing that is tucked up and around the body.

Scottish kilts originate back to the 16th century, when they were traditionally worn as full length garments by Gaelic-speaking male Highlanders of northern Scotland. They were referred to as a léine, Gaelic for “shirt” and typically, the garments were draped over the shoulder or pulled over the head as cloaks. The wearing of Scottish kilts was common during the 1720s, when the British military used them as their formal uniforms. The knee-length kilt, similar to the modern kilt of today, did not develop until the late 17th or early 18th century.

Early Scottish kilts were made using self-colored garments, which were white or dull brown, green or black as opposed to the multicolored plaids or tartan designs recognized today. As dyeing and weaving techniques improved during the late 1800s, tartan patterns were developed, and these plaid designs became native to Scotland using tartan cloth.

The “great kilt” and belted plaid evolved from the tartan wrap, when woolen wraps and plaids began to emerge as a highly desirable form of fashion and a sign of cultural affluence. In time, the garments were worn gathered at the waist in what became the belted plaid. It was called in Gaelic feileadh-mór, meaning “great wrap” or breacan-an-feileadh, meaning “tartan wrap.” The belted plaid became a popular dress among Highland men during the 17th century and as late as 1822, when they were worn largely for ceremonial purposes as opposed to being a part of everyday dress. The female version was referred to as the arisaid, which was worn down to the ankles and generally made from white tartan cloth with a wide-spaced pattern.

During the mid to late 17th century, the “small kilt,” phillabeg or feileadh-beag, in Gaelic, or “little wrap” developed. The pleated “small kilt” or “walking kilt” is basically the bottom half of the great kilt from the 16th century Scottish Highlands, which was belted plaid using untailored cloth. The garment was loosely gathered into folds and belted at the waist, falling to just above the knee, with a few inches of cloth overlapping the top of the belt. Typically, a separate length of cloth was worn over the shoulders for protection and warmth.

The phillabeg was prevalent during the first half of the 17th century throughout central Scotland and the Highlands. However, in an effort to repress Highland culture, King George II imposed the Dress Act of 1746, which made it illegal for the Highland regiments to wear garments resembling any form of Highland dress, as well as the tartan kilt. King George II’s opponents were threatening to replace him using Jacobite armies. In a panic, he intended to use the act’s provisions to ban the kilt from Highland armies so that he could easily determine those who were supporting the Jacobite position and eliminate them.

However, the phillabeg kilt continued to be worn as a fashionable garment by the Scottish romantics and became a form of protest against the oppression from the English government. The ban was lifted in 1782, at which time the kilt became an enduring symbol of Scottish identity throughout Scotland and the traditional kilt gave way to the creation of kilt garments using tartan patterns, which represented particular clans, families, regions or countries. Generally, when a buyer ordered a kilt, they requested a specific tartan, of which today, there are more than 3,500. When making a kilt, the tartan’s pattern must remain unbroken throughout the garment, therefore, it takes approximately 20 to 25 hours since nearly all the work is still done by hand.

Beginning in the 1790s, the phillabeg style of kilt was replaced by the tailored kilt, becoming the modern Scottish kilt of today. The difference between the phillabeg and the tailored kilt is that the pleats of the kilt are sewn down, as opposed to being gathered, folded and belted. Initially the tailored kilt was worn by the military during the 1790s when they were box-pleated, but there was no tapering. Civilian tailored kilts were made sometime after, although they weren’t pleated until approximately 1820, when they were pleated to the bottom hem line. The Gordon Highlanders became the first military regiment to begin using the knife pleat (1853), and by the 1900s, it was accepted in civilian kilt designs. As fashions transformed, designs of the tailored kilt progressed to linings, waistbands, buckles and straps. Generally, modern-day Scottish kilts have 29 pleats and are made using approximately 8 yards of tartan fabric.

During the 19th century, Scottish kilts were a form of ceremonial dress and worn only for special occasions and primarily to formal events, such as weddings, sporting events, Highland games and holiday celebrations. However, through a global cultural process of recognizing Scottish identity in America, reinventing traditions and building the Scottish-American Heritage, the Scottish kilt is increasingly being recognized as an acceptable form of dress at informal parties, as casual wear or everyday attire and returning to its cultural roots. The Scottish kilt has become a required uniform for Scotland’s Tartan Army soccer team and encouraged for the team’s fans.

A History of Scottish Kilts


©2018 AUTHENTIC VACATIONS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
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History of Pipe Bands and Competition

Pipe Bands

Bagpipe and Drum bands were initially a creation of the Scottish Regiments in the British Army. Each regiment initially had several drummers, the title given to those who played drums as well as those who played either a bugle or a fife. The role assigned to the drummers was to sound various regimental duty calls and to play regimental music. Several of the regiments have published collections of bagpipe music where the various regimental call tunes can be found. Pipers were added to the “drums” in various regiments at the urging of their officers and the cost of having pipers was initially the responsibility of the officers.
Bagpipes became an increasingly important part of regimental life with the passage of time and efforts were made to standardize the way bagpipe music was played so that bands from different regiments could play together when necessary or appropriate. These efforts led to the publication of two books of bagpipe music in the mid 1930’s (The Army Manuals) that contained both bagpipe music and accompanying drum music. A school of piping was also established, located at Edinburgh Castle, whose purpose was to raise the level of musical competence of military pipers and to train soldiers to direct regimental pipe bands.
Bagpipe band competitions also appear to have initially developed in the British Army. There are records of contests within and between regiments. In addition, when championship pipe band competitions were established, the records indicate that the winners were often military pipe bands. Civilian pipe bands grew in popularity as military pipers left the service but continued to maintain their interest in playing and in playing well. This was particularly true following World War II. Police Departments and collieries often supported the development of these civilian bands, some of which still exist today and compete at the highest levels, for example Shotts and Dykehead Caledonian Pipe Band and some of Police Service Scotland and Canadian Police pipe bands.

Pipe Band Competitions

When pipe bands compete against each other, they are evaluated in terms of the nature and quality of their piping, the nature and quality of their drumming and in terms of ensemble criteria where how well and how musically the pipe and drum sections of the band play together to create a musical package is assessed.
The bagpipe section is judged on the nature and quality of the sound that they produce, the consistency of sound over the entire performance, playing technique, expression, execution and how well they play in unison.. The drum section is judged on similar criteria. The ensemble judge focuses on how well the overall performance fits together, how well the drum settings support and enhance the pipe music, the steadiness of tempos, how well the different pieces of music that make up the performance fit together and the quality of transitions between tunes and time signatures.

Massed Pipe Bands

The pomp and ceremony so often required in the British Army led to combining military bands (both bagpipe and regimental brass bands) as well as to combining the pipe bands of the several batallion’s of a specific regiment together on various occasions. This was continued in the competitive civilian pipe band world for the purposes of drawing and entertaining crowds as well as having all of the bands in one place so that prizes could be awarded. The massed bands ceremonies also provided an opportunity for people who enjoy bagpipe music to hear music with which they were familiar, as bands often played music specifically developed for competitions during their competitve performances.

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Festival Grounds Map

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Parade Grounds Exhibitions

A few new Happenings on the Parade Grounds this year…..

 

The Vikings of Ullr –                                       10:00 AM & 2:00 PM

Finger Lakes Hurling –                                  11:00 AM & 3:00 PM

12 Noon –  OPENING CEREMONIES

The Children of the Mist –                             1:00 PM & 4:00 PM

S.A.M.S. Flag Retirement Ceremony –     6:00 PM

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Education Tent Schedule

We are working on the 2019 schedule for our New Education Tent.  We are always looking for ideas and folks who might be interested in being a Presenter this coming year.  Come join us and share information about history, heritage, and lifestyles of our Celtic Ancestors.  Send us a note at flceltic@yahoo.com with your ideas!

10:00 AM –

11:15 AM –

12:45 PM –

1:45 PM –

2:45 PM –

3:45 PM –

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